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Vídeo de cachorrinha encontrando Pato Donald na Disney emociona a internet

Veja essa e outras imagens de Nala, a golden retrivier que foi a Orlando comemorar aniversário

Por Redação VEJA São Paulo Atualizado em 21 set 2019, 11h24 - Publicado em 21 set 2019, 11h23

Nala é a uma cachorrinha da raça golden retrivier que vem abalando as redes sociais. O motivo? Ela é apaixonada pelo Pato Donald e o encontro aconteceu recentemente numa viagem para Disney, onde comemorava seu aniversário.

A cachorrinha se deitou na barriga do personagem e ali permaneceu durante uns segundinhos. Enquanto isso, Pato Donald se mostrou emocionado, apontando para os olhos como se estivesse chorando.

Com 23 000 seguidores até o momento desta publicação, Nala tem uma série de fotos e vídeos pra lá de fofos na rede social. Confira essa e outras imagens de amolecer qualquer coração:

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A gente não aguentaaaa! 😍😭 Essa cachorrinha ama o Pato Donald e foii visitá-lo em seu próprio aniversário! Ô mo deusooo, itii itiii maliaa. (📹: @helperdognala )

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Nala always happily jumps right into the ride when it’s time for the Speedway! She loves the wind and always sniffs the air 🚙

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Wow, I’ve been in Florida for 2 months already as of today. So much has changed for the better. • Content: trauma, mention of SI • On that note, it’s easy for me to get caught up in living an old life, a life that doesn’t really fit me anymore. PTSD just kind of just… does that. • Just 2 months ago, I was living back in Pennsylvania. Every day I would wake up, take sleeping pills, and go back to sleep, some days taking more pills than others, hoping it would knock me out for good. A couple times a week, I had a part time job, but I was constantly breaking down, and letting my mental health totally disrupt that. I wasn’t really taking care of myself or eating properly, just sort of existing. I struggled so much with bad habits that kept me in some very dark places. • I became very familiar with my local hospitals (and so did Nala since she always stayed with me), and it was a very, very hard year. The hospital is never a fun time, especially when a lot of my issues are trauma related, and the most a hospital can do for you is switch up your meds and keep you safe. But each and every time I ended up there, unfortunately, I needed to be there. • Now, I wake up, am able to go about my day fairly normally. And by “normally,” I mean, not sleeping the whole day away, eating 1-2 meals, my job that I do is going very well, and I’m getting out and about with Nala several times a week! I would be lying if I said I still didn’t struggle, trauma can still get to you even if you’re not in the situation that hurt you so badly, but it hurts a lot less right now because I’m not immersed in it. I’m able to keep myself a lot safer now, for the most part, where as before, I wasn’t sure if the day I woke up would be my last. • I worked really hard to get here, but @crippled.fox was always there for me when I was stuck in PA staying on the phone with me, and Nala too because she is one of the only reasons why I’m still here. I just…never want to go back to where I was. The way things are looking, I should honestly be a-OK.

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Nala met Jack Sparrow! She was very excited to see him because Pirates of the Caribbean is one of Nala’s absolute favorite rides.

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As a lot of people know, there are many different tasks you can teach a psychiatric and autism service animal. A task is anything that the SD does that mitigates your disability. However, please keep in mind that comfort is not a task. ❁ •Crowd control: this is when the dog circles the handler. Other forms of crowd control may be standing in front or behind the handler to act as a barrier between people. ❁ •Interruptions: this is when the dog either nose bumps you, paws at you, or does another behavior to get you to stop doing what you’re doing, such as scratching, crying, etc. Contrary to what a lot of people call it, this is not something I would call an alert. This is more of a response to a behavior you are doing. You may think, “but I don’t know I’m doing this behavior, so it must be an alert” or “I scratch myself before a panic attack, so my dog is alerting to the panic attack because he paws at me when I start doing x behavior.” But an alert is when the dog is telling you something that you and somebody else would not be able to notice before it happens or as it’s happening. Even if you don’t know you’re doing x behavior, it’s not something that isn’t visible to the human eye. They’re seeing the behavior and doing something about it. They’re not actually sensing that a change is happening in your body, which is what a true alert is. ❁ •Alerts: this is when a dog is able to tell that a change is happening in your body. Some service dogs alert to a rising heart rate before a panic attack, or even cortisol, etc. Then of course there are other types of service dogs that can alert to seizures, blood sugar, etc. ❁ •Guide tasks: This is when a dog is able to find exits, certain people, your car, a follow command, etc. This could be helpful in many cases for people with psychiatric SD’s or autism SD’s. Dogs can guide by giving more leeway on the leash and letting them sniff out said place with you following behind, or using a traditional guide set up. ❁ •This is not a full list of everything they can do, but just some ways that service animals can help with autism and psychiatric disabilities.

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This post mentions scars & the word burn but no in depth or detailed discussion on the “topic,” just referencing a conversation with a cast member. • • • On Saturday, I went to Epcot for the evening with a friend. She had signed up to do a DVC tour and invited me to join. The cast member checking us in, within 30 seconds of me being there, said, “okay, I’m going to say something.” *long pause* “Are those burns?” I was so caught off guard. “No, they’re not.” Then he said, “I know what those are.” Me: “okay?” I was getting very uncomfortable as me & my friend were both making eye contact thinking is this really happening at Disney with a freaking cast member? Then he goes, “listen, if I’m taking it too far, just tell me.” And I said, “yes, this is too much, please stop.” And he doesn’t stop- he keeps going. He says, “I know I’m crossing a boundary…” begins to tell me that he has scars all over his legs and tells me why/assuming we’re twinning or something. And starts trying to comfort me repeatedly and tries to almost pry about my history. He goes, “I’m still here, she’s still here” referring to my friend… I was just like, shook. • If a random stranger said that to me, I’d be less caught off guard (because yes it happens), but also when he asked if it was too much, & I said it was, he didn’t respect that boundary at all, which is the part that angers me the most. I know he was trying to be nice, & sometimes, if you have similar experiences, it can be comforting. I don’t really care that he brought up the topic as I’m honestly pretty used to it- I’m sure his heart was in the right place, that being said, I did tell him it was too much after he asked me/made that comment, and he didn’t stop. • On this topic, I also think it’s important to remember not everyone’s disability presents the same & it’s never okay to comment on somebody else’s body and just assume that you’re open to talk about it just because you can relate. • There’s so much more to a person than their disability or what may seem as obvious struggles. • Why am I sharing this? • Because scars are a normal part of life no matter where they come from, and your body is your business, not anyone else’s.

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Don’t be dumb(o) and pet service dogs without asking. Not only is it incredibly rude, but it can distract the dog! I have no problem telling people they can’t touch Nala when i didn’t give permission. I do not tolerate unsolicited pets where people come up and start fluffling her head or grab her tail. Not ok. So many people act like they’ve never heard the word no before. 🙄 If I release her to say hi, that is different! But if you come up to a working dog and pet them without asking, shame. on. you. Even if you don’t know about service dogs, you should know not to pet a RANDOM DOG that doesn’t belong to you.

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Nala loved meeting Rapunzel 💖👑

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Swipe to see Nala give Tarzan kisses 🥰💖😘

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Things to consider when choosing a dog to train as a service dog and why I don’t recommend adopting: • Does the breeder do all the proper health testing on the parents (hips, heart, eye, etc) and are they free from genetic conditions? • What is the temperament of the parents like? • Do their dogs engage in sports or shows? Pet dogs are great, but having dogs that are involved in activities will *help* you gauge how one of their dogs will be as a working dog in the future. Do they have any other past puppies working as service dogs? • Good breeders will also have their puppies come with a health guarantee, so if something happens early on, you’re in a sense, protected. • Also, a breeder who has many, many dogs is a red flag for a puppy mill. • These are just a few things! • I personally do not recommend adopting a dog for service work. Most good breeders will let their puppies go at 8 weeks, and there is a critical socialization period that ends at about 4 months, so it’s important to expose your dog to loud noises, different sights, and sounds from a young age. • If you adopt an older dog, you won’t get to do that, and their fears will be unknown. You also likely won’t have much of a background on the dog, so you don’t know their history, or anything. • The dog may come home and be a wonderful fit for a few weeks, but their true colors may start to show later on. • If you’re getting a dog to train as a service dog, you don’t want to mess around. There are so many unknowns with adopting, in my opinion, it’s just not worth it. They could have unknown health issues passed down from their parents, etc. And if you are unable to care for more than one dog, it can be heart breaking to rehome them in attempt to finding a better fit for service work. • Last but not least, do not go to a backyard breeder or a pet store to get your dog for reasons that should be obvious.

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